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Pay Disparities and Sex Discrimination: How to Review Compensation Practices to Address Gender Pay Gap Issues and Minimize Legal Liabilities

Pay Disparities and Sex Discrimination: How to Review Compensation Practices to Address Gender Pay Gap Issues and Minimize Legal Liabilities

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Pay Disparities and Sex Discrimination: How to Review Compensation Practices to Address Gender Pay Gap Issues and Minimize Legal Liabilities

Live Webinar: Wednesday, April 5, 2017

1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern/10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Pacific

The National Committee on Pay Equity has declared April 5, 2017 National Pay Day and the time has never been more critical to look at how your organization determines employees’ pay rates and identify any gender disparities that could put you at legal risk. 

The Department of Labor recently issued a final rule for government contractors to eliminate secrecy about pay. The purpose of the rule is to help level the playing field when it comes to equal pay and eliminate discrimination—particularly with women who earn less on the dollar than their male counterparts. 

And it’s not just federal contractors who are gaining protection. For instance: 

  • Massachusetts passed pay equity legislation in 2016 that’s much broader than federal law because it bars potential employers from screening prospective employees based on their past salary history, among other things 
  • In Philadelphia, the city council passed a bill that prohibits the same type of screening, which is thought to perpetuate wage disparity. 
  • The national trend is moving toward pay equity regulation, and employers understandably have questions about the practical impact of the added scrutiny. 


What are the legal issues for employers to consider under pay equity laws? For companies not affected by the law, what are the benefits and drawbacks to allowing for greater pay transparency and is there a tangible link between pay equity and job satisfaction? What are the recommended steps for evaluating an organization’s pay practices? 

Join us on April 5 for the answers to these questions and more. Attorney Amelia Holstrom of Skoler, Abbott & Presser, P.C. will cover how federal laws and some state laws around pay transparency are shaping up, and how these developments are likely to affect organizations’ compliance obligations going forward. You’ll get valuable insight into how to examine your own pay practices to determine if there are gender or other compensation gaps to remedy for a better working climate, too. 
  
Plus, you’ll learn: 

  • How sex discrimination and the gender gap in compensation can undermine the company, increase turnover, and erode trust 
  • Why transparency can be a good thing—and how to communicate effectively regarding wage determination 
  • Where to look to see if your state, county, or city has enacted (or is considering) wage-gap regulations 
  • Ways to determine salary and pay without having past salary history as a baseline 
  • Legal issues that can arise around pay disparities 
  • How to avoid a sex discrimination lawsuit by getting your compensation practices in order 
  • And much more! 

About Your Presenter:

Amelia HolstromAmelia Holstrom, Esq. 
Associate 
Skoler, Abbott, & Presser PC 

Amelia J. Holstrom is an associate at Skoler, Abbott, & Presser, P.C., in the Springfield, Massachusetts office. Ms. Holstrom joined the firm in 2012 after serving as a judicial law clerk to the judges of the Connecticut Superior Court, where she assisted with complex matters at all stages of litigation. Her practice is focused in labor law and employment litigation. Since joining the firm in 2012, she has assisted clients in remaining union-free; represented clients at arbitrations; and defended employers against claims of discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wrongful termination claims, as well as actions arising under the Family Medical Leave Act and wage & hour law. Additionally, Ms. Holstrom frequently provides counsel to management regarding litigation avoidance strategies. She is a frequent contributor to business and human resource publications and a contributing author to the Massachusetts Employment Law Letter

 

Have a specific question related to the topic of this audio conference? Post it here and get an answer during the event, time permitting, or in a follow-up e-mail from the audio conference presenter. This is only available to audio conference registrants.

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